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5 Outrageous Ways the Federal Government Has Wasted Your Money (Part IV)

Jul 6, 2018 by AFP

Congress just spent $1.3 trillion on a massive omnibus package. The national debt is ballooning.

In the meantime, the federal government has wasted your hard-earned money on…studying the social habits of monkeys?

It’s true. Read on to discover some egregious examples government waste, as documented by Sen. James Lankford in his 2017 Federal Fumbles report.

$85 Million Spent Building an Unfinished Hotel in Kabul 

A Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction report shows the Overseas Private Investment Corporation loaned $85 million to a contractor for construction of a hotel and apartment complex in Kabul, Afghanistan. The project was never completed.

The U.S. Government Accountability Office later found that OPIC inspects fewer than 10 percent of the projects it funds and does not require employees conducting inspections to report back in a timely manner.

This lack of accountability to the American people and wasteful spending of tens of millions of tax dollars is horrifying. In the future, groups like OPIC would do well to put the American people first when considering how to spend our hard-earned money.

$1.04 Billion to Expand a Trolley 

In late 2016, the Department of Transportation gave San Diego a $1.04 billion grant to expand the city’s trolley service…by a whopping 10.9 miles. DOT estimates a total of 24,600 people might ride the trolley each day.

More than $1 billion is a crazy amount of taxpayer money to spend on such a small group of people, compared with the millions who use America’s highway system.

The federal government should be more judicious with taxpayer funds in the future when determining grants for America’s transportation system.

$55 Billion to Preserve Outdated Technology 

The federal government spends $80 billion on technology-related expenses every year.

The GAO found that in 2015, federal agencies and departments spent $55 billion of that budget on preserving older technology, rather than using newer and more efficient forms of computing and storage.

American taxpayers deserve to know their money is being spent efficiently and responsibly. By spending billions of dollars to prop up old technology, rather than investing in faster, cheaper and more efficient technology, the federal government is doing a disservice to our nation.

$1.6 Billion on Vehicles the Government Probably Doesn’t Need 

The federal government has spent $1.6 billion of your hard-earned tax dollars buying 64,500 cars, vans and trucks at an average cost of $25,600 each.

The problem? The federal government already owns nearly 450,000 vehicles, and a GAO report found there is no way to determine whether all vehicles owned by the agencies are actually in use.

It’s likely that the federal government is buying vehicles it doesn’t need and paying to keep vehicles it doesn’t use. When the federal government is already overspending, government agencies should strive to use our tax dollars efficiently rather than making unnecessary and redundant purchases.

$1.2 Million Researching the Social Habits of Monkeys 

Researchers from the National Institutes of Health spent $1.2 million on the taxpayer’s dime to develop “comfortable collars” with tracking devices for monkeys to study the primates’ social habits.

While it’s possible to learn something from studying our furry friends, spending more than $1 million is more than excessive – it’s bananas.

It’s time for the federal government to stop monkeying around with our tax dollars.

Wasteful federal spending is a serious problem – and it’s something lawmakers need to address.

Our national debt has now hit $21 trillion and continues to spiral upward as the federal government spends billions of your hard-earned tax dollars on assorted pet projects. It’s time for the feds to rein in federal spending, starting with the FY 2019 spending bills.

Demand that Congress cut wasteful spending now! Tell our lawmakers to think of taxpayers as they write the FY 2019 spending bills.